Victor Hugo

7 February 1854: Thomas Falla writes from Guernsey to Victor Hugo in Jersey

Hugo's daughter Adèle kept a diary while the family were in Jersey. The original is in the Morgan Library in New York and the Maison Victor Hugo in Paris. In it she records conversations with Hugo during the Tapner affair. Here is a translation of the entry for the 9 February, 1854, a letter from Thomas Falla, John Charles Tapner's advocate during his trial for murder: 

Extracts from The Star, September 1916

Children misbehaving at Candie ; Healy Maindonald, bigamist ; Fishing on Sunday ; Petition re military service ; Roll of Honour ; Ernest Carré, Le Poidevin, Ferguson ; Enlistments ; Bordage widening ; Guernseymen killed ; Albion Terrace School ; Old custom for scaring birds ; Jean-Philippe De Carteret obituary ; Guernsey prices The Star , September 2, 1916 BAND INTERRUPTION AT CANDIE Many correspondents have spilt ink in writing to you complaining of the behaviour of juveniles at the Sunday evening performances in Candie, but apparently they have fallen on deaf ears, as the nuisance still…

L'Archipel de la Manche

We asked the question: who wrote the following and when? 'Cross a ravine, go down and across Mill Street, into a sort of fissure between two tall houses, climb up a narrow and interminable set of tortuously winding steps with loose paving stones, and you find yourself in a Bedouin village; hovels, cracks in the roads, dirt alleys, burnt gables, ruined houses, deserted rooms, windowless and doorless with grass growing inside them, beams across the road, ruins blocking the way, here and there an inhabited cottage, little naked boys, pale women; you would think you were in Zaatcha.' And gave you a clue: the original is in French.

Victor Hugo and Guernsey: Hugo's workmen

5th July 2017
An interview with, and the obituary of, 'the oldest man in the island,' Thomas Mauger Gore, carpenter and builder, who helped Victor Hugo realise his vision at Hauteville House and especially at Hauteville II, Juliette Drouet's house in Guernsey. Obituary from The Star of Tuesday March 6, 1928, interview in the same newspaper,  July? 1927. Part of the Victor Hugo and Guernsey project.

Victor Hugo and Guernsey: Paul Stapfer

16th June 2017
The Parisian Paul Stapfer was born in 1840 and graduated in Classics in 1860. In 1866 he joined the staff at Elizabeth College, Guernsey, to teach French. He calculated that this employment would give him time to work on his doctorate in English literature, and that he could thus both improve his English and observe the doings of Victor Hugo. He was the author of a significant book of memoirs of Victor Hugo, Victor Hugo à Guernesey: souvenirs personnels. This is part of the Victor Hugo and Guernsey project.

Victor Hugo and Guernsey: Hennett de Kesler

16th June 2017
When the French government declared an amnesty in August 1859, the majority of political exiles returned to France. Victor Hugo announced that he would return to his homeland only when liberty returned there; he would not accept the amnesty. His friend Kesler pursued the same policy and remained in Guernsey until his death in 1870. This is part of the Victor Hugo and Guernsey project.

Victor Hugo and Guernsey: Victor Hugo's coachmen

9th June 2017
Victor Hugo had a couple of favoured coachmen whom he used to drive him on his excursions around the island. Hugo had a few strictly prescribed routes, and would become almost anxious if pressed to deviate from them. This would sometimes prove tedious for his familial entourage, who would often accompany him; but Mme Drouet was always happy to indulge him. This is part of the Victor Hugo and Guernsey project.

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